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Monday, July 21, 2014

Decoding Developers: VisionMobile’s New Developer Economics Report

VisionMobile Developer Economics -- 3scaleIn an earlier post, I announced that with the API Magazine I teamed up with VisionMobile as media partner for their 7th global survey for the Developer Economics Report 2014/Q3. I am very happy to announce that this report is now finalized and available.

Developer Economics is the leading research program on mobile developers and the app economy, tracking developer experiences across platforms, revenues, apps, tools, APIs, segments and regions.

Based on a survey of 10,000+ app developers, the 7th edition Developer Economics: State of the Developer Nation Q3 2014 research report investigates the latest trends and discusses platforms, languages, consumer vs. enterprise revenues, as well as developer tools and segments.

Download your free Developer Economics report here.

Here are the key insights of that report summarized:

  • On a global level the platform wars are ending with iOS claiming the majority of the high-end device market and Android winning almost everywhere else. Windows Phone continues to gain developer mindshare steadily at 28%.
  • HTML5 is the most widely used at 42% of developers with Java, the native language on Android, the next most popular at 38%.
  • A surprisingly high 47% of iOS developers and 42% of Android developers are using something other than the native language on their platforms.
  • The majority of app businesses are not sustainable at current revenue levels. 50% of iOS developers and 64% of Android developers are below the ‘app poverty line” of $500 per app per month.
  • 67% of mobile app developers primarily target consumers and 11% target professionals directly. The 16% of developers who target enterprises are twice as likely to be earning over $5k per app per month and almost 3 times as likely to earn more than $25k per app per month.
  • Games dominate app store revenues, yet most games developers struggle. 33% of developers make games but 57% of those games make less than $500 per month.
  • Third party tools are a critical part of successful app businesses. There’s a strong correlation between tool use and revenues, the more tools a developer uses, the more money they make.
  • The breakdown of developer segments that target each platform is determined by how well the platforms help them meet their goals. Adoption of iOS amongst Explorers and particularly Hobbyists is limited, while the opposite is true for Windows Phone.

The key themes covered in the report are:

  • Platform wars go local - Global vs. regional Mindshare
  • Language ranking - Most popular vs. most actively used programming languages
  • Language lock-in - Language mix for Android, iOS, Windows Phone, BlackBerry
  • App monetization - App revenues globally, Android vs. iOS, app revenue split
  • Consumer vs. enterprise - Revenues for developers targeting consumers vs. enterprises
  • Game developers - Revenues for mobile game devs, top platforms and tools
  • Developer tools - Revenues of devs using tools, top tool categories
  • Developer segments - Characteristics, sizes and revenues of the 8 developer segments

Download your free Developer Economics report here.

 

VisionMobile: Developer Economics Report -- 3scale

About VisionMobile

VisionMobile is the leading research company on the apps economy and mobile business models. Their research helps clients track app developer trends and master mobile business models. Developer Economics is VisionMobile’s semi-annual industry research series, tracking app developer trends, attitudes, experiences and monetization by region. VisionMobile’s mantra: distilling market noise into market sense.



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Monday, June 30, 2014

API Magazine Newsletter (June’14): About APIs and Developer Evangelists

The June 2014 edition of the API Magazine Newsletter just went out. This edition featured topics including:

  • My article about the trend from value chains to value networks
  • A summary of the key announcements at Google I/O
  • A debate about the consequences of API copyrightability
  • The Mobile Megatrends 2014 by VisionMobile
  • APItools.com
  • The Crunchbase and Nest APIs
  • And many more…

Click here to read the newsletter or on the banner at the top to subscribe.

This monthly email newsletter is an extract of the online API Magazine on Scoop.it where I curate and comment all sort of topics around the API economy (technical and strategic) and developer evangelism.



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Friday, June 27, 2014

Monday, June 2, 2014

The May 2014 edition of the API Magazine Newsletter just went out. This edition featured topics including:

  • The final part of my series about the key elements of software engineering for mobile 
  • The opportunities of transportation APIs and open data on ProgrammableWeb
  • Some thoughts about the various dimensions of platform scalability and how twitter engineered that
  • Several articles about API copyrighting and its implications
  • A write-up about the epic twitter presentation at APIStrat Amsterdam
  • The slides of my talk about the contribution of APIs to the emergence of value networks at APIdays Mediterranea
  • Some stuff about DX
  • Some stuff about real REST
  • And many more…

Click here to read the newsletter or on the banner at the top to subscribe.

This monthly email newsletter is an extract of the online API Magazine on Scoop.it where I curate and comment all sort of topics around the API economy (technical and strategic) and developer evangelism.



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Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Full Stack Marketing

I just found this post from Wade Foster (co-founder of Zapier — which connects Web apps and automates stuff) which is a great description of the skills of the modern marketer: Full Stack Marketer.

wadef:

A few days ago, Marcelo Calbucci, had a great post in Geekwire about the lack of great marketing minds in startups.

For whatever reason marketing seems to be a second rate citizen in startup land. Most startups are sucking up as many engineers as possible, but delaying marketing help until after a significant funding round.

Read More



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Monday, April 28, 2014

API Magazine at APIdays Berlin

I wrote in an earlier post that I am covering the APIdays event in Berlin with the API Magazine. At this earlier post you can find also more info about the whole APIdays global event series, the Berlin instance specifically and the speaker line-up.

At APIdays Berlin I will moderate two sessions on the second day (Tuesday, May 6th) in the morning. These sessions will be about the elements of an effective developer program. My objective is to highlight the importance of developers in the API value chain, and to talk about how to build a successful developer program.

Here is an overview over the preliminary topics of these sessions:

Session 1 (Tuesday, May 6, start at 9:15): The Elements Of An Effective Developer Program

  1. Core Elements Of A Developer Program (short intro)
    By Manfred Bortenschlager (3scale@ManfredBo)
  2. What Is Developer Marketing?
    By Caroline Lewko (WIP@CarolineWIP)
  3. Six Great Ways to Increase API Adoption
    By Adam DuVander (SendGrid@adamd)
  4. Evangelists As Developer Program Drivers
    By Manfred (@ManfredBo)

Session 2 (Tuesday, May 6, start at 11:30): Developer Program Elements In Action

  1. Developer Program Best Practices From Experience
    By Cristiano Betta (PayPal@cbetta)
  2. Devangelist Lessons From The Road
    By Tony Blank (context.io@thetonyblank)
  3. The Pulse Of The Planet
    By Romain Huet (Twitter@romainhuet)

We will mostly likely conclude with a panel discussions with all the speakers from the sessions.

Here you can sign up and get a ticket for APIdays Berlin.

Here is more info about the APIdays Berlin event:
The APIDays are a global tour covering six cities: Barcelona, Berlin, Moscow, Paris, San Francisco and Tokyo. APIDays is also vendor-independent and genuinely wants to drive to API space forward and covers a wide range of topics such as scalability, versioning, developer experience, testing, mobile, security or business models. For a complete overview of the Berlin agenda see here



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Friday, April 25, 2014

API. Three letters that have to be considered for every digital strategy

I published this article first on LinkedIn and republish it here.

When we are driving a car we are actually steering and controlling a quite complex system of many components that make up an automobile. I have the steering wheel to control the car’s steering mechanism and set the direction. I have the foot pedals to control the engine and brakes. I have the gearshift to access the gearbox. And I have the dashboard that gives me constant feedback about some aspects of the car’s condition. This way I interface with the car in a very simple and efficient way and I don’t need to know any details about how the various components function internally.

This is exactly what an API does.

An API (application programming interface) is a specification that defines how to interact with software components. APIs enable access to services, content or resources of an organization. Organizations can manage and control APIs via API management solutions, which are basically gateways with rich API configuration features. An API management solution is what in my car analogy is represented by the car cabin with all my steering and controlling functions.

With this approach organizations can expose assets via APIs and decide who can access these assets and in which way. Generally there are three levels of access: public, partner or private (which is internal access). Assets can be included in other software solutions such as, for instance, mobile apps, Web sites or Web services by internal or external third parties.

Exposing APIs can lead to a combination of benefits that include: additional revenue channels or extension of existing channels, wider reach (e.g., increase of an organization’s brand awareness), external sources of innovation (facilitating the idea of open innovation), or increase in efficiency. In fact, efficiency increase is the main underlying benefit, the others are rather consequential.

This concept of generating additional value for an organization by opening up access to assets via interfaces gave rise to the API Economy. This term has emerged to describe the ecosystem around APIs which subsumes the whole API value chain.

More formally, in the “Winning in the API Economy” ebook Steven Willmott and Guillaume Balas define the API Economy as:

…an umbrella term referring to the emerging economic effects – and its related ecosystem – enabled by companies, governments, non-profits and individuals providing direct programmable access to their systems and processes through the means of APIs.

Even more formally, the API Economy is based on five axioms, which for the interested reader are discussed in the article “The Five Axioms of the API Economy” in detail. The core message – put simply – is that the concept of API and the API Economy will have a significant impact on how organizations create and capture value and how they interact with each other and with customers. APIs will form an essential part of strategy.

There is almost no industry that is not disrupted by digital technology as Business Insider (“The Future of Digital: 2013”) and Forrester (“Six Steps to Become a Digital Business”) very clearly show. Forrester’s Nigel Fenwickclaims that “74% of business executives say their company has a digital strategy.” Hence, a digital strategy must be part of the business strategy and contribute to the overarching business objectives.

Because of the power and value of APIs, I would go one step further and claim that APIs must be leveraged as part of a digital strategy. Gartner states that the nexus of four forces– Social, Mobile, Cloud, and Information – will have a transformational impact on digital. APIs are a key enabler for all the four forces. Further emerging trends fuelled by APIs are wearables and the vision of the Internet-of-things – both are already becoming reality.

Many successful examples prove the value of APIs. The potential is enormous and I am convinced that, like Web and mobile, APIs will form a considerable part of every effective digital strategy.



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Monday, April 14, 2014

The API Magazine supports the largest developer survey by VisionMobile

imageWith my API Magazine I am supporting the 7th global Developer Economics study surveying over 7,000 mobile app developers. This study is conducted by VisionMobile – the leading research company in the app economy and mobile business models. 

VisionMobile produces very valuable insights into developer attitudes, trends, platform mindshare, tools and monetization opportunities. I find their work and insight extremely useful and regularly refer to it. Many mobile industry players and experts use that resource constantly, too. 

And that is why I support their work.

So, if you are a developer, have your say and complete the survey.

It takes less than 10 minutes. The resulting report is free, usually around 50 pages and participants will get a notification when it is ready for download.

In addition, respondents can win great prizes, including:

  1. An iPhone 5s
  2. A Galaxy S5
  3. A Lumia 930
  4. A Blackberry Z30

And a lot more!

More about the resulting Developer Economics report

The Developer Economics report is the de-facto research on the app economy and developer ecosystems by VisionMobile, based on the largest, most global developer surveys. The Developer Economics survey is conducted twice a year, tracking platform Mindshare, monetisation by platform and revenue models, use of tools and investigating opportunities and challenges in mobile development today.

This 10-minute survey is aimed at app developers. Survey respondents can enter a draw to claim great prizes, such as latest handsets and cool gadgets. Each of the respondents can also claim a free, 1-month subscription to Bugsense’s crash reporting tool.

As always, the survey results will become publicly available as a free download - so that respondents can get a sense of what the latest trends are and what other developers have to say.



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Tuesday, April 8, 2014

API Magazine covers APIDays Berlin

With my API Magazine I am supporting and covering the APIDays edition in Berlin on May 5th and 6th. 

The APIDays are a global tour covering six cities: Barcelona, Berlin, Moscow, Paris, San Francisco and Tokyo. APIDays is also vendor-independent and genuinely wants to drive to API space forward and covers a wide range of topics such as scalability, versioning, developer experience, testing, mobile, security or business models. For a complete overview of the agenda see here

For the Berlin edition already 50 speakers in three tracks have confirmed and over 250 attendees are expected.

APIDays Berlin is solely focused on the builders of the web. The goal is to provide a great learning experience and an open forum to bring together the finest minds in the API space and foster dialogue.

I will organise and hold a workshop at APIDays about the elements of an effective developer program. I will invite some experts to present and discuss this topics. My objective is to highlight the importance of developers in the API value chain and also to inform about how to build a successful developer program.

I will provide more details about this workshop and the speakers soon.

You can sign up and get a ticket for APIDays Berlin here.

Below you can find a selection of the currently confirmed speakers.



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Tuesday, April 1, 2014

API Magazine Newsletter (March’14): About APIs and Developer Evangelists

The March 2014 edition of the API Magazine Newsletter just went out. This edition featured topics including:

  • My summary and key take-aways from the API Strategy and Practice (APIStrat) conference in Amsterdam and another coverage by ProgrammableWeb
  • Several hijacked Maslow pyramids
  • An elaboration of the building blocks of API management by the API Evangelist himself
  • Mike Amundsen’s keynote from APIStrat
  • Several videos of excellent keynote talks — including one about the husbandry of developer evangelism
  • A tutorial about Grape on Ruby to expose REST APIs
  • Top-10 IoT concerns
  • A discussion about APIs vs SDKs
  • And many more…

Click here to read the newsletter or on the banner at the top to subscribe.

This monthly email newsletter is an extract of the online API Magazine on Scoop.it where I curate all sort of topics around the API economy and developer evangelism.



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